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The power required for this process of injection moulding

Release time:2018-08-09

Power requirements[edit]

The power required for this process of injection moulding depends on many things and varies between materials used. Manufacturing Processes Reference Guide states that the power requirements depend on "a material's specific gravity, melting point, thermal conductivity, part size, and molding rate." Below is a table from page 243 of the same reference as previously mentioned that best illustrates the characteristics relevant to the power required for the most commonly used materials.

Material Specific gravity Melting point (°F) Melting point (°C)
Epoxy 1.12 to 1.24 248 120
Phenolic 1.34 to 1.95 248 120
Nylon 1.01 to 1.15 381 to 509 194 to 265
Polyethylene 0.91 to 0.965 230 to 243 110 to 117
Polystyrene 1.04 to 1.07 338 170

Robotic moulding[edit]

Automation means that the smaller size of parts permits a mobile inspection system to examine multiple parts more quickly. In addition to mounting inspection systems on automatic devices, multiple-axis robots can remove parts from the mould and position them for further processes.[33]

Specific instances include removing of parts from the mould immediately after the parts are created, as well as applying machine vision systems. A robot grips the part after the ejector pins have been extended to free the part from the mould. It then moves them into either a holding location or directly onto an inspection system. The choice depends upon the type of product, as well as the general layout of the manufacturing equipment. Vision systems mounted on robots have greatly enhanced quality control for insert moulded parts. A mobile robot can more precisely determine the placement accuracy of the metal component, and inspect faster than a human can.[33]

Gallery[edit]